Assessment of risk and sero-prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization among remote Orang Asli tribes in Peninsula Malaysia

Kavitha Thevakumar, Josephine Rebecca Chandren, Guillermo Ignacio Perez-Perez, Eng Guan Chua, Lay Kek Teh, Mohd Zaki Salleh, Jin Ai Mary Anne Tan, Alex Hwong Ruey Leow, Khean Lee Goh, Alfred Chin Yen Tay, Barry J. Marshall, Jamuna Vadivelu, Mun Fai Loke, Li Ping Wong

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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Abstract

The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is related to human poverty with marked differences between developing and developed countries. Socioeconomic factors and living standards are the main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the risk and sero-prevalence of H. pylori colonization among Orang Asli in Peninsula Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Orang Asli subjects in seven isolated settlements spanning across all three major tribes (Negrito, Proto Malay and Senoi) in Malaysia. Sociodemographic characteristics of the subjects were obtained through interview. Subjects were tested for H. pylori colonization based on CagA and whole cell (WC) antigen serological assays. A total of 275 subjects participated in this study. Among these subjects, 115 (44.7%) were H. pylori sero-positive with highest sero-prevalence among Negrito (65.7%). Among subjects who were H. pylori sero-positive, CagA sero positivity was also significantly higher among Negrito. The highest proportion of respondents reported to be H. pylori sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (57.9%), males (56.2%), Negrito (48.6%) and live in bamboo house (92.3%). The highest proportion of respondents reported to be CagA sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (41.4%), males (35.6%) and Negrito (48.6%). The results of this study demonstrate that H. pylori colonization can be related to age, gender, tribes and house materials and CagA sero-positive stain closely associated with age, gender and tribes.

LanguageEnglish
Article numbere0159830
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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tribal peoples
Helicobacter pylori
seroprevalence
Malaysia
risk assessment
Population Groups
Epidemiology
Bamboo
Assays
Coloring Agents
Antigens
gender
Age Groups
Surveys and Questionnaires
sociodemographic characteristics
socioeconomic factors
poverty
bamboos
developed countries
cross-sectional studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Assessment of risk and sero-prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization among remote Orang Asli tribes in Peninsula Malaysia. / Thevakumar, Kavitha; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Chua, Eng Guan; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Goh, Khean Lee; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Marshall, Barry J.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Li Ping.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 7, e0159830, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Thevakumar, K, Chandren, JR, Perez-Perez, GI, Chua, EG, Teh, LK, Salleh, MZ, Tan, JAMA, Leow, AHR, Goh, KL, Tay, ACY, Marshall, BJ, Vadivelu, J, Loke, MF & Wong, LP 2016, 'Assessment of risk and sero-prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization among remote Orang Asli tribes in Peninsula Malaysia' PLoS One, vol 11, no. 7, e0159830. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159830
Thevakumar, Kavitha ; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca ; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio ; Chua, Eng Guan ; Teh, Lay Kek ; Salleh, Mohd Zaki ; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne ; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey ; Goh, Khean Lee ; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen ; Marshall, Barry J. ; Vadivelu, Jamuna ; Loke, Mun Fai ; Wong, Li Ping. / Assessment of risk and sero-prevalence of Helicobacter pylori colonization among remote Orang Asli tribes in Peninsula Malaysia. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 7.
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